The Chronic Lyme Coma

This chronic disease thing is interesting; on one hand you have days (weeks, months, years…) where you live in kind of a haze, out of touch and not quite yourself (even though you may “look fine” to others). Survival mode as I call is just where you are clinging day to day, surviving, getting by. In that way time just sort of passes you by and even though everything you are missing out on hurts, you are sort of numb to it at the same time.Then you have times where are doing a bit better and get your head above water so-to-speak. These times can be hopeful and wonderful and amazing! And yet you can in these times experience the deep pain of loss and loneliness for everything and everyone you have missed out on in your life. So moments of “life” can be very bitter sweet, and depending on how you handle them, can be even more painful than the drudgery of malaise. 

Does anyone else experience this? Where you could almost want to bury your head in the sand again because you feel the pain so acutely of lost time, lost experiences, lost love…. Things unattainable that have passed you by?

It is a fight to live through chronic illness and (I find) it is a fight to come back out of it. I wonder how many people have this experience?

It’s like your body and mind are in a certain gear, and I know having learned about neuropathways that they can be very hard to change, especially with habits, addictions, lifestyles and living a certain way for a long time. But it can be done, so does anyone else who is actually escaping the grip of death by spirochete feel like they have to go through a recovery process and learn how to live?


#lyme #chroniclyme #isolation #loss

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Do you live in Washington? Would you like someone to pay you for being sick? It’s possible….

Those of us with chronic illness know all too well the financial strain of chronic illness; not only is it MASSIVELY expensive to treat but most of us either can’t work full time or can’t work at all.

That’s why I wanted to share a little discovery that may not make a big dent in your income, but everything helps.

If you live in Washington there is a unique lab in Everett (one of only two in the country) that supplies unique plasma for research and testing (NOT human donation). They have a criteria they look for and want people with severe food and seasonal allergies, but also autoimmune diseases and….Lyme!

Payment is dependent on which catagory you fit into and what their clients are looking for at the time. But generally you might receive $185-$200 for a donation. And once you are in their database you can donate again and again.

Let me share my experience on the process and how it feels:

Initially you come in and fill out paperwork, and bringing any past blood work you may have had is helpful. They take an initial blood draw to be tested to see if you qualify for their program. Several weeks later they will let you know and then you can schedule your donation.

For me I had to wait longer because my ND was not initially happy with my ferritin levels and wanted them to be built up. So several months later I made my appointment. It takes about 2 hours including paperwork and testing the day of your donation. They do an intitial finger prick to check some levels and how you are doing that day (surprisingly it didn’t hurt), they want to make sure they won’t be harming you by taking plasma. They also do a urine sample to test (I believe) protein levels and a few other things. If these look good you can begin your donation!

For those of us that get regular IV’s the needle is no more uncomfortable than this. You are hooked up to a machine for approximately 45 minutes. It cycles back and forth drawing out blood, extracting plasma, and putting your red cells back. This is great because with regaining your red blood cells you don’t feel faint or weak like you would giving blood. During the process you are in a comfortable lounge chair with a heating pad and blanket if you want it. The nurse was extremely nice and chatty and told me that some of their donations travel all over the world for research.

When you’re done they give you a payment slip and send a check in the mail.

So, the process really isn’t too bad. I would recommend anyone with a chronic illness (or severe allergies) look into this to make some money and maybe make a difference at the same time.

If you do, PLEASE mention Jennifer Steidl sent you because the other best part is that once you are a donor they also pay you for referrals. So in that way we can help each other through these meager seasons. 

http://www.plasmalab.com

Also I have included location information in the photo 🙂